Transaction Support Centre report

2020-07-17T12:58:49+00:00July 17th, 2020|News|

South Africa is globally renowned for its efforts in providing access to affordable housing to the poorest in its society. A Centre for Affordable Housing Finance (CAHF) initiative.

Image credit: nannynme

Image credit: nannynme

Central to its efforts has been the national housing subsidy programme, which has delivered upwards of 3.5 million units to qualifying beneficiaries across the country since 1994. While these houses have provided improved shelter and access to services, questions remain about how these properties perform as assets for the households who receive them and what role these properties play in the creation of integrated, sustainable cities. Abundant anecdotal evidence highlights the significant barriers that limit formal property market participation and mortgage lending, and impede property and asset performance.

It is into this space, that the Transaction Support Centre (TSC) was established, to support the realisation of formal housing market transactions in a low-income neighbourhood in Cape Town, South Africa. Over the past two years, the TSC has experienced first-hand the barriers that impede formal transactions, and the very significant repercussions these have for property-owning households, the development of trajectories of lower-income neighbourhoods, and by extension the transformation of South African cities.

Join our conversation as we look back at what we have learned over the past two years and discuss a way forward for the TSC, including our thoughts on key policy recommendations required to drive systemic change. We will also take this opportunity to share the TSC’s plans for the year ahead.

Date: Tuesday, 28 July 2020 | Time: 3:00 – 5:00 SAST

The insights and discussion shared during the webinar are contained in our recently launched report

“The Transaction Support Centre: Lessons Learned” which is available to download here.

The presentation and formal responses will be for 1.5 hours,
followed by 30 mins for an interactive discussion and debate.

We hope that you can join us!

Read the report press release here